Pulse Product News

Pulse Electronics' Sidewinder AC Current Sensors Provide a Highly Linear Output Voltage Over a Wide Dynamic Range

More accurate sensing from greater distances for distributed power generation, renewable energy and storage, load balancing, power monitoring, AMI, and smart meters


July 28, 2011 -- Pulse Electronics Corporation (NYSE: PULS), a leading provider of electronic components, introduces its new Sidewinder™ AC current sensors. Sidewinder products differ from traditional current sense transformers because they do not need a core. This makes them lighter, easier to assemble, and less expensive. The sensors provide a highly linear output voltage over a very wide dynamic range from 0.1 to 1000 Amperes (A), making them especially suited for applications such as distributed power generation, renewable energy and storage, load balancing, power monitoring, advanced metering infrastructure (AMI), circuit breaker panels, and smart meters.

"Pulse's new Sidewinder products are a disruptive technology for AC current sensing," explained Glenn Roemer, field application engineer, Pulse Electronics Power Division. "Metering and sensing of all kinds can be recorded from a larger spectrum and range of distances and tracked more accurately and precisely than previously possible. These new sensors meet the tightest specifications in the market, which is especially critical for smart metering applications."

Pulse's current sensors have a phase error of < 0.05 degree, a 100KHz bandwidth, and a low temperature coefficient. They are based on the Rogowski Coil principle*. Pulse Electronics' patent-pending precision winding technique controls the parameters which directly influence the output voltage in current sensors. The segmented winding approach allows for a high number of winding turns per unit length to provide a sufficiently large output voltage for detection and integration.


Sidewinder products meet the Class 0.2 percent accuracy limits defined by the IEC 62053-22 and ANSI C12.20 standards for currents from 0.1A to 200A and above as well as the Class 1 requirement for immunity to external magnetic fields. They are immune to external AC magnetic fields and DC magnetic fields. The addition of a Faraday shield over the winding prevents electrostatic coupling from the AC voltage of the primary conductor and acts as an effective barrier against external electrical fields associated with nearby current carrying conductors.

Although the standard sensor is round, as are traditional sensors in the industry, because Pulse's sensors are not based on the traditional toroid core (round) shape, but on a coil configuration, the sensor can be made in several shapes and thicknesses in addition to the traditional round shape. The AC current sensors are supplied in trays, but other packaging options are available. They are priced at $1.90 each for 100,000 pieces. Samples and prices are available upon request. More information on Pulse Electronics' Sidewinder products can be found on datasheet P698 located on the Pulse Electronics website at:

http://productfinder.pulseeng.com/products/datasheets/P698.pdf and also the Sidewinder site page.

* The Rogowski coil principle states that a conductor carrying an AC current i(t) and passing through a helical coil induces a voltage across the coil that is proportional to the rate of change of the current (di/dt) in the conductor.

About Pulse Electronics:

Pulse Electronics is the electronic components partner that helps customers build the next great product by providing the needed technical solutions. Pulse Electronics has a long operating history of innovation in magnetics, antennas and connectors, as well as the ability to ramp quickly into high-quality, high-volume production. The Company serves the wireless and wireline communications, power management, military/aerospace, and automotive industries. Pulse Electronics is a participating member of the IEEE, SFF, OIF, HDBaseT Alliance, CommNexus, and MoCA .

Cautionary Note: This press release contains statements that are "forward-looking" within the meaning of the Private Securities Litigation Reform Act of 1995 and involve a number of risks and uncertainties. These forward-looking statements are based on the Company's current information and expectations. There can be no assurance the forward-looking statements will be achieved. Actual results may differ materially due to the risk factors listed from time to time in the Company's SEC reports including, but not limited to, those discussed in the Company's Form 10-Q for the quarter ended April 1, 2011 in Item 1a under the caption "Factors That May Affect Our Future Results (Cautionary Statements for Purposes of the "Safe Harbor" Provisions of the Private Securities Litigation Reform Act of 1995)." All such risk factors are incorporated herein by reference as though set forth in full. The Company undertakes no obligation to update any forward looking statement.